A popular question that businesses are asked is “How well do you know your customer?” It is a great question. It’s fabulous because if you actually take the time to dive into it, you’ll discover who your customer is beyond stereotypical demographics. You’ll get to the personality traits and the personal interests of your customers. Simply put—the more you know, the better you are able to target and predict their buying behavior.

The flip side of this question is “How much do your customers know about you?” At first this may seem like a laughable question, but hear me out. It’s easy to assume that your clients know everything about you, that they know all of the services you provide, and the ways that you can help them. But the reality is, they probably only know how you are working with them and not much else. Having said that, should they know more?

Think about the last time that you went to the grocery store. Think about the eggs and toilet paper that you bought. Can you name the specific brand name? Can you describe the packaging in detail? Do you know the product tagline or the company tagline? Why did you pick that product instead of another? What do you know about the company whose product you purchased—do you know their environmental practices, their employee policies, or even who the manufacturer is?

It’s ok if you didn’t know all of this information—that’s that point. You would be surprised at how little your customers actually know about your company, the services that you provide, other ways you can help them, or even how to refer you.

So where does this leave you? It’s simple.

Give your clients a reason to remember you—be sticky. It is not their responsibility to remember you. They have their own lives to live. Be proactive with sitting down with each client at least yearly and share your views of what was accomplished during this time. Find out what else is going on with their business. This will allow you to see and educate them about other potential areas that you could work together. It also gives you the opportunity to plant seeds about how they can refer you to others.